Sangria Wine Jelly: Easy Microwave Recipe For Wine Lovers!

If you’ve ever wanted to turn your wine into a spreadable form, then this Sangria wine jelly is for you. It’s perfect spread on all sorts of treats, and is really simple to make thanks to this microwave recipe. You can even sip on the leftover wine while you make it!

sangria wine jelly microwave recipe dinners done quick

Why You’ll Love This Recipe

This recipe takes your favorite wine and turns it into a spreadable jelly! It’s delicious on crackers, toast, scones, and even as a cheesecake topper. Basically, anywhere you’d normally enjoy some fruit or jelly is a great place to use it.

The microwave shortcuts a lot of the work required where you’d normally need to stand over a stove, and I love making things easier!

If you choose to fully can the jelly, then you’re going to need a stove to seal your cans. However, you can make a small batch that’s stored in the fridge and use it within a week to avoid the canning process.

stacked up sangria wine jelly jars

I also love that you can really use whatever wine you like! Sangria is a great choice because it’s sweet and naturally contains fruit flavors. However, most any red or fruit wine works, so choose your favorites.

If you want some different flavor profiles, then you can also learn how to make Microwave Peach Jam with fresh peaches (and a hint of whiskey)!

What You’ll Need: Ingredients

ingredients to make sangria wine jelly in the microwave
  • 2 Cups sangria wine
  • 2 ½ Cups granulated sugar 
  • 3-Ounce pouch liquid fruit pectin (such as Certo)

Special Equipment Note: You will need some canning jars (such as Ball) to store your jelly in. It doesn’t matter what size – I’m using 4-ounce quarter pint jars. This recipe makes about 40 oz total so adjust the quantity of jars based on size. They are available at most grocery, farm, and hardware stores.

Ingredient Tips and Notes

  • Any type of red, sangria, or fruit wine of your choice will work (it’s best if under 12% ABV but a little higher is fine), so choose your favorite! I’m using Capriccio sangria with flavors of pineapple, lemon, lime, grape, pomegranate, and orange
  • You can use up to 3 cups of sugar if your wine is on the drier side (to try and balance the sweetness levels). Don’t try to use less than the recipe calls for, though, or the jelly won’t set right
  • It’s important to note that I’m using liquid pectin for this recipe. You can use powdered, but you’ll need to adjust as follows: Add 1 heaping Tbsp powdered pectin and 1 Tbsp lemon juice to the wine before the first cook (and before adding the sugar). Then, you should be able to follow the rest of the recipe as normal

How to Make Sangria Wine Jelly in the Microwave

  1. Sterilize your jars (this is usually done by boiling the glass jars in a large pot for 10 minutes or if your dishwasher has a sterilize function that works as well)
  2. Place the wine into a large, microwave safe bowl
add wine to a microwave safe bowl
  1. Cook in the microwave on high for 4-5 minutes to bring the wine to a boil
  2. Add the sugar to the bowl, and stir until the sugar is completely dissolved 
mix sugar into boiling wine
  1. Return the bowl to the microwave, and cook on high for another 4-5 minutes, until mixture boils again
  2. Remove the bowl from the microwave and immediately stir in the liquid pectin, mixing well
add pectin and mix to incorporate
  1. Skim any foam that may have formed, and then use a ladle or a funnel to fill your sterilized jars, leaving about ½” of head space
funnel mixture into glass jars
  1. Make sure there is no jelly on the edge or rings (wipe it up if so) and then place the lid on the jar and screw on the band
place lids on all canning jars
  1. Invert the jars for a few seconds so that the hot jelly touches the lids
invert jars so jelly hits the lid
  1. Cool, then store in the refrigerator for up to a week
let wine jelly cool in jars
  1. Optional: To seal the jars, place them into a large stock pot (not touching) and cover them with about 1” of water. Bring to a boil, and cook for 10 minutes at a boil. Use jar tongs or similar to remove them from the boiling water and place on a towel covered rack. You should hear popping sounds shortly thereafter, as the lids vacuum seal. Allow them to fully cool, then tighten the rings and store in a cool, dark place for up to 6 months
overhead view of sangria wine jelly spread over crackers

What to Use Wine Jelly With

  • Buttery crackers
  • Toast
  • Scones
  • Biscuits
  • Pancakes
  • Cheesecake
  • Yogurt
  • Cottage cheese
  • Rice pudding
  • Baked brie
  • Charcuterie board
  • Oatmeal
  • Ice cream
  • Cake filling
  • Cookie filling
  • Muffin filling
  • Crepe filling
  • Meat glaze (such as ham or chicken wings)
  • Barbecue sauce
  • Grilled cheese or panini

There are so many ways to use sangria wine jelly, from simple spreads to fillings, mix-ins, and sauces. Anywhere you’d enjoy a fruity touch or sweet for your spicy is a great choice.

Try your sangria wine jelly in place of the cranberry preserves in my easy Air Fryer Cranberry Brie Bites, as part of the glaze for Air Fryer Ham Steak, in an adult Air Fried PB&J or Air Fryer Cheese Danish, as a topper on my Microwave Rice Pudding, or even in place of the raspberry in these Raspberry Coffee Cake Muffins.

Make sure to check out some of my Box Cake Hacks to make your cake even better (besides using this jelly as a filling, that is)!

Recipe FAQs

Does Wine Jelly Have Alcohol?

Much of the alcohol cooks out during the process of making the jelly. However, there will be some residual alcohol so it’s not entirely alcohol free.

So, it’s not recommended to serve wine jelly to minors. However, your morning toast shouldn’t be enough to create a buzz.

Does Wine Jelly Need to Be Refrigerated?

Wine jelly needs to be refrigerated if it is not fully sealed during the canning process. It may stay in the refrigerator for use for up to a week.

Even sealed jelly, once the seal is broken, should be stored in the refrigerator for use.

Does Wine Jelly Go Bad?

Yes, like any jam or jelly, wine jelly does eventually go bad. Generally, this is after a week when stored in the refrigerator, or after about 6 months if canned and stored.

Never eat canned jelly if the seal pops up and down when pressed before opening. Look for discoloration or strange odors as well to determine if it has gone bad.

How Long Does Jelly Take to Set With Alcohol?

Generally, jelly takes 4 to 6 hours to set with alcohol. However, the higher the alcohol content the longer it may take, with 24 hours being possible.

If your jelly has not set after 24 hours, that typically means that it’s not going to. Feel free to use it as a nice sauce, though.

Recipe Pro Tips

  • Put some wax paper down on your workspace before you fill the jars for easy cleanup!
  • If you’re fully canning them, you can use the same water for boiling additional batches of jars. Just make sure to top off the water if it’s not high enough, and don’t put cold jars in hot water (they should still be warm from when you filled them)
  • The seals of the jars typically pop in about 30-60 seconds after removing from the boiling water. However, sometimes you’ll get a stubborn one that will go after a few minutes. If you get one that won’t seal, you can reboil it and try again, or just pop that one in the fridge for immediate use
  • Cooking times are based on a 1000W microwave. If yours is higher or lower times may vary slightly. I just watch through the window to see when it boils so it should be easy to adjust as needed
scooping sangria wine jelly on a spoon

Storage

  • If you do not fully seal the jars, then the wine jelly should be stored in the refrigerator and consumed within 1 week
  • For boiled and sealed jars, they may be stored in a cool, dark place for up to 6 months. Refrigerate after you pop the seal on one and consume within a week
  • Never consume jelly if the seal pops up and down on the jar before opening, as this indicates a bad seal and presence of bacteria is likely

More Microwave Sweet Treats to Try

Final Thoughts

This sangria wine jelly is so simple to make thanks to your microwave! Of course, you can boil it on the stove as well if that’s what you prefer, but I hate having to stand and stir constantly.

If you’re afraid of canning, you can just pop a batch into a sterilized jar and store it in the fridge for use this week. However, it’s a great time to try something new and seal them up to enjoy for months!

This recipe is very easy to make, and perfect for a complete canning novice. If I can do it, you can too!

If you’re looking for more wine recipes, check out my super easy Microwave Mulled Wine for a festive holiday treat that comes together in minutes!

sangria wine jelly microwave recipe dinners done quick featured image

Easy Sangria Wine Jelly Recipe (Microwave Method)

This easy sangria wine jelly can be made in the microwave! Even canning novices can produce flavorful jelly in minutes.
5 from 1 vote
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 10 minutes
Cooling Time 2 hours
Total Time 2 hours 20 minutes
Course Garnish, Sauce
Cuisine American, Vegetarian
Servings 80
Calories 30 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 2 Cups sangria wine
  • 2 ½ Cups granulated sugar
  • 3 Ounce pouch liquid fruit pectin (such as Certo)

Instructions
 

  • Sterilize your jars (this is usually done by boiling the glass jars in a large pot for 10 minutes or if your dishwasher has a sterilize function that works as well)
  • Place the wine into a large, microwave safe bowl
    2 Cups sangria wine
  • Cook in the microwave on high for 4-5 minutes to bring the wine to a boil
  • Add the sugar to the bowl, and stir until the sugar is completely dissolved
    2 ½ Cups granulated sugar
  • Return the bowl to the microwave, and cook on high for another 4-5 minutes, until mixture boils again
  • Remove the bowl from the microwave and immediately stir in the liquid pectin, mixing well
    3 Ounce pouch liquid fruit pectin
  • Skim any foam that may have formed, and then use a ladle or a funnel to fill your sterilized jars, leaving about ½” of head space
  • Make sure there is no jelly on the edge or rings (wipe it up if so) and then place the lid on the jar and screw on the band
  • Invert the jars for a few seconds so that the hot jelly touches the lids
  • Cool to room temperature, then store in the refrigerator for up to a week
  • Optional: To seal the jars, place them into a large stock pot (not touching) and cover them with about 1” of water. Bring to a boil, and cook for 10 minutes at a rolling boil. Use jar tongs or similar to remove them from the boiling water and place on a towel covered rack. You should hear popping sounds shortly thereafter, as the lids vacuum seal. Allow them to fully cool, then tighten the rings and store in a cool, dark place for up to 6 months

Notes

  • Any type of red, sangria, or fruit wine of your choice will work (it’s best if under 12% ABV but a little higher is fine), so choose your favorite! I’m using Capriccio sangria with flavors of pineapple, lemon, lime, grape, pomegranate, and orange
  • You can use up to 3 cups of sugar if your wine is on the drier side (to try and balance the sweetness levels). Don’t try to use less than the recipe calls for, though, or the jelly won’t set right
  • It’s important to note that I’m using liquid pectin for this recipe. You can use powdered, but you’ll need to adjust as follows: Add 1 heaping Tbsp powdered pectin and 1 Tbsp lemon juice to the wine before the first cook (and before adding the sugar). Then, you should be able to follow the rest of the recipe as normal
  • Put some wax paper down on your workspace before you fill the jars for easy cleanup!
  • If you’re fully sealing the jars, you can use the same water for boiling multiple batches. Just make sure to top off the water if it’s not high enough, and don’t put cold jars in hot water (they should still be warm from when you filled them)
  • The seals of the jars typically pop in about 30-60 seconds after removing from the boiling water. However, sometimes you’ll get a stubborn one that will go after a few minutes. If you get one that won’t seal, you can reboil it and try again, or just pop that one in the fridge for immediate use
  • Cooking times are based on a 1000W microwave. If yours is higher or lower times may vary slightly. I just watch through the window to see when it boils so it should be easy to adjust as needed
  • If you do not fully seal the jars, then the wine jelly should be stored in the refrigerator and consumed within 1 week
  • For boiled and sealed jars, they may be stored in a cool, dark place for up to 6 months. Refrigerate after you pop the seal on one and consume within a week
  • Never consume jelly if the seal pops up and down on the jar before opening, as this indicates a bad seal and presence of bacteria is likely
  • Exact nutritional values will vary based on brand and flavor of ingredients, and quantity consumed (a serving is 1 Tbsp), so please consider this a guideline only

Nutrition

Serving: 13gCalories: 30kcalCarbohydrates: 6.8gSodium: 0.7mgPotassium: 4.2mgSugar: 6.7gCalcium: 0.4mg
Keyword easy jelly recipe, microwave jelly, microwave jelly recipe, microwave wine jelly, red wine jelly, red wine jelly recipe, sangria wine jelly, sangria wine jelly recipe, wine jelly, wine jelly recipe
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sangria wine jelly microwave recipe dinners done quick pinterest
Katie Vine
5 from 1 vote (1 rating without comment)

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